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Jean-Baptiste Corot Self-Portrait oil painting


Self-Portrait
Painting ID::  27009
Jean-Baptiste Corot
Self-Portrait
mk52 c.1835 Oil on canvas 34x25cm Uffizi,Florence

   
   
     

Jean-Baptiste Corot Self-Portrait oil painting


Self-Portrait
Painting ID::  29008
Jean-Baptiste Corot
Self-Portrait
mk65 Oil on canvas 13 3/8x9 13/16in Uffizi,

   
   
     

Jean-Baptiste Corot Mott memories Fontainebleau oil painting


Mott memories Fontainebleau
Painting ID::  57281
Jean-Baptiste Corot
Mott memories Fontainebleau
mk255 for in 1864. 0.65 x 0.89 meters canvas. Paris, the Louvre

   
   
     

Jean-Baptiste Corot Blue skirt woman oil painting


Blue skirt woman
Painting ID::  57282
Jean-Baptiste Corot
Blue skirt woman
mk255 for in 1874. 0.80 x 0.50 meters canvas. Paris, the Louvre

   
   
     

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     Jean-Baptiste Corot
     1796-1875 was a French landscape painter and printmaker in etching. Corot was the leading painter of the Barbizon school of France in the mid-nineteenth century. He is a pivotal figure in landscape painting and his vast output simultaneously references the Neo-Classical tradition and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism. Camille Corot was born in Paris in 1796, in a house at 125 Rue du Bac, now demolished. His family were bourgeois people his father was a wigmaker and his mother a milliner and unlike the experience of some of his artistic colleagues, throughout his life he never felt the want of money, as his parents made good investments and ran their businesses well. After his parents married, they bought the millinery shop where she had worked and he gave up his career as a wigmaker to run the business side of the shop. The store was a famous destination for fashionable Parisians and earned the family an excellent income. Corot was the middle of three children born to the family, who lived above their shop during those years. Corot received a scholarship to study in Rouen, but left after having scholastic difficulties and entered a boarding school. He was not a brilliant student, and throughout his entire school career he did not get a single nomination for a prize, not even for the drawing classes. Unlike many masters who demonstrated early talent and inclinations toward art, before 1815 Corot showed no such interest. During those years he lived with the Sennegon family, whose patriarch was a friend of Corot's father and who spent much time with young Corot on nature walks. It was in this region that Corot made his first paintings after nature. At nineteen, Corot was a big child, shy and awkward. He blushed when spoken to. Before the beautiful ladies who frequented his mother's salon, he was embarrassed and fled like a wild thing Emotionally, he was an affectionate and well-behaved son, who adored his mother and trembled when his father spoke. When Corot's parents moved into a new residence in 1817, the twenty-one year old Corot moved into the dormer-windowed room on the third floor, which became his first studio as well. With his father's help he apprenticed to a draper, but he hated commercial life and despised what he called "business tricks", yet he faithfully remained in the trade until he was 26, when his father consented to his adopting the profession of art. Later Corot stated, I told my father that business and I were simply incompatible, and that I was getting a divorce. The business experience proved beneficial, however, by helping him develop an aesthetic sense through his exposure to the colors and textures of the fabrics. Perhaps out of boredom, he turned to oil painting around 1821 and began immediately with landscapes

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     | Berndt Lindholm | John Hamilton Mortimer | Panini, Giovanni Paolo |


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